Forest Science and Health

NASF, AFF Applaud Introduction of Empowering State Forestry to Improve Forest Health Act of 2017

Bipartisan Bill to Prioritize Forest Landscape-Scale Projects Across Both Private and Public Land

WASHINGTON—This week Senator Steve Daines (R-MT) and Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) introduced the Empowering State Forestry to Improve Forest Health Act of 2017. This bipartisan legislation would direct funding toward the highest priority projects, resulting in measurable improvements to non-federal private forests and nearby National Forest System lands. 

Drought, Bark Beetles Weaken California's Trees

California has more than 100 million dead trees in its forests, and there is no consensus on their impact on the environment or how to deal with them.
In November, the U.S. Forest Service said an aerial survey revealed that 36 million additional trees had died in the midst of a multi-year drought, bringing the total since 2010 to more than 102 million.

The tree deaths have been concentrated in the southern and central Sierra Nevada, but experts warn of increasing deaths in forests all the way up to the Oregon border.

Webinar: Forest Management for Wildlife

The increasing emphasis on multiple-use forests can be a challenge for landowners and land managers. 

During a webinar scheduled for February 15,  Mark McConnell with the University of Georgia, D.B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources will discuss strategies to increase wildlife populations and habitat while maintaining a productive, healthy forest stand. 

Topics covered will include preferred tree species for wildlife, stand structure, and different management strategies for various wildlife species, especially in the southeastern United States.

Indiana releases latest state forest inventory analysis

Indiana's state forest inventory analysis for 2015 has been released by the DNR Division of Forestry. The report contains data on overall tree diversity, growth and mortality. 

“The data indicate that a significant portion of the mature trees in the state forest are aging, succumbing to natural events and a combination of those factors,” said John Seifert, State Forester and director of the DNR Division of Forestry. 

Invasive beetle threatens Tulsa's 200,000 ash trees

Since the emerald ash borer was first found in Oklahoma nearly three months ago in a trap near Grove, a few sightings from private land owners in that area—one verified—also have been reported.

The pest is of particular concern for Tulsa, given the city’s proximity to Delaware County and use of ash trees in streetscapes and parks.

The ash borer is a beetle not native to North America that attacks all types of ashes, with the potential to kill small trees in a year or two and large ones in three to four years.