Pests and Disease

Invasive emerald ash borer gets closer to South Dakota

Ash trees in South Dakota are on the cusp of endangerment.

The emerald ash borer (EAB), a green beetle that feasts on the vascular tissue of ash trees, has been expanding from its original discovery in Detroit, Mich. It has killed hundreds of millions of trees in the United States in the past decade, expanding from the Great Lakes region in 1990 to 25 states today, including Iowa, Minnesota and Nebraska.

Drought, Bark Beetles Weaken California's Trees

California has more than 100 million dead trees in its forests, and there is no consensus on their impact on the environment or how to deal with them.
In November, the U.S. Forest Service said an aerial survey revealed that 36 million additional trees had died in the midst of a multi-year drought, bringing the total since 2010 to more than 102 million.

The tree deaths have been concentrated in the southern and central Sierra Nevada, but experts warn of increasing deaths in forests all the way up to the Oregon border.

Invasive beetle threatens Tulsa's 200,000 ash trees

Since the emerald ash borer was first found in Oklahoma nearly three months ago in a trap near Grove, a few sightings from private land owners in that area—one verified—also have been reported.

The pest is of particular concern for Tulsa, given the city’s proximity to Delaware County and use of ash trees in streetscapes and parks.

The ash borer is a beetle not native to North America that attacks all types of ashes, with the potential to kill small trees in a year or two and large ones in three to four years.

Presidential Transition Plan: Trees and Forests are America’s Natural Capital

Trees and forests built America and are essential for the nation’s growth and success. State forestry agencies are poised to support the new presidential administration. The National Association of State Foresters (NASF) is pleased to provide the Donald Trump Administration and Congress with recommendations for capitalizing on the benefits of trees and forests. 

Aerial Survey Identifies More Than 100 Million Dead Trees in California Alone

The USDA Forest Service recently identified an additional 36 million dead trees across California since its last aerial survey in May 2016. This brings the total number of dead trees since 2010 to over 102 million on 7.7 million acres of California’s drought stricken forests.

In 2016 alone, 62 million trees have died, representing more than a 100 percent increase in dead trees across the state from 2015. Millions of additional trees are weakened and expected to die in the coming months and years.